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KÜHL’s AIRSPEED™ Men’s Shirt Review

KÜHL sent our team the AIRSPEED shirt to review and I was immediately impressed.

Pirate Blue
KÜHL’s AIRSPEED™ Men’s Shirt

Colorado summers where I live are warm and dry with temperatures fluctuating from early morning to evening. Higher in the mountains, you get a wider range and lower low points in the morning and evening.

I found this shirt to be the perfect outdoor companion for those types of days.

For our test, I took this on an overnight camping and hiking trip.

The AIRSPEED is a long-sleeve shirt, which provides ample, UPF 30+, coverage. It was warm enough for cool mornings hiking through the woods. As the day heated up, the cuffs roll up easily to attach to a button located mid-bicep.

It is constructed using three different fabric types:

  • Fabric 1: 72% Nylon, 28% Polyester | 88 GSM
  • Fabric 2: 85% Polyester, 15% Cotton | 160 GSM
  • Fabric 3: (Mesh): 85% Polyester, 15% Cotton | 160 GSM

This combination of fabrics makes the AIRSPEED a breathable, high-performance shirt. The knit panels provide ventilation and stretch for easy movement. The sleeves are designed with five panels for freedom of motion; making it easy to set up the tent or cast a fishing line.

Pirate Blue
KÜHL’s AIRSPEED™ Men’s Shirt

Throughout the testing period, I found this shirt to be extremely comfortable. While hiking with a backpack on, my back did get sticky. It’s worth noting that the fabric isn’t “moisture wicking,” but as KÜHL describes it: “moisture managing.”

But after my hike, as I rested at the camp site, the shirt dried out quickly.

Additional features on this shirt include:

  • Zipper security pocket where I was easily able to stash my driver’s license and credit card
  • Hidden, button-down collar
  • Two button-down chest pockets for additional storage
  • Sunglass cleaner inside bottom left placket
Pirate Blue
KÜHL’s AIRSPEED™ Men’s Shirt

This is an extremely functional and durable shirt. Perfect companion for the outdoors. And it pairs really well with our recently reviewed KÜHL RENEGADE pant.

I am 5’11” and 185 pounds and wear a size large. Found that it fit true to size.

You can purchase this on their website or at your favorite outdoor store.

Voited Pet Blanket Review

Our furry gear tester, Parker, was immediately in love with Voited’s Premium Recycled Pet Blanket that they sent us to review.

VOITED QUILTED PREMIUM RECYCLED PET BLANKET
VOITED QUILTED PREMIUM RECYCLED PET BLANKET

We’ve been working on “place” with Parker and it became an instant new favorite place with it’s soft micro-fleece.

Full length, it is 54×37 inches. In our house, we keep it folded in half, which is the perfect size for Parker.

The Premium Recycled Pet Blanket is made from high-quality, recycled Ripstop with an antibacterial and antistatic treatment. Given that it’s the height of shed season, it repels fur well with a good shake.

It can be used a variety of ways. From protecting furniture to functioning as a bed in your car or tent. It’s perfectly cozy to take anywhere to snuggle with your pup.

I am looking forward to the warmer months to use while camping. Given how Parker has claimed it, it’ll also be perfect for car rides as a consistent and familiar bed.

VOITED QUILTED PREMIUM RECYCLED PET BLANKET
VOITED QUILTED PREMIUM RECYCLED PET BLANKET

Voited’s Premium Recycled Pet Blanket can be purchased on their website and retails for $90.

High Camp Flask Firelight 750ml Review

With summertime camping approaching, I have been on the lookout for how I can bring my love of cocktails with me to the campsite. Sure, I could bring bottles and utensils and cocktail shakers, but that is a lot to bring with me. Alternatively, I could buy and bring pre-made cocktails, but where is the fun in that?

High Camp Firelight 750 Flask
High Camp Firelight 750 Flask

High Camp Flasks sent me their Firelight 750ml Flask to test and I think I might have found the perfect solution.

The Firelight 750ml Flask is big enough to hold a bottle of wine or my favorite whiskey, but what I found myself drawn to was making pre-made cocktails to store and serve.

Portable Ranch Water

14 oz. Tequila Blanco

7 oz. Fresh Lime Juice (or 7 limes)

1.5 oz. Agave Nectar

Topo Chico Sparkling Water or your favorite sparkling water

Mix together the Tequila, lime juice, and agave nectar and pour in your Firelight 750ml Flask. When serving pour roughly 3 oz. of the mixture into your drinking vessel with ice and top with Topo Chico Sparkling Water.

Alternatively, this ratio works well with your favorite whiskey. You could also swap it out for rum and swap out the Topo Chico for Spindrift Pineapple Sparkling Water.

Flask Features

What makes the Firelight 750ml Flask so cool is its features.

It stores in a slick fabric bag and comes with two 6-Shooter Tumblers that secure to the top and bottom of the flask using a magnetic locking system. The Tumblers are double-walled, so they keep drinks cold.

High Camp Firelight 750 Flask
High Camp Firelight 750 Flask

Additionally, the flask itself is vacuum insulation, keeping that Ranch Water perfectly chilled or your wine at room temperature even outdoors.

It weighs only 29 oz. empty, so if you’re backpacking, it doesn’t add much additional weight. Essentially it weighs only a little more than your typical vacuum sealed water bottle.

It retails for $125 and can be purchased along with other cocktail accessories at https://highcampflasks.com/.

Cozy Up This Winter With Selk’Bag Human Shaped Sleeping Bag

When it comes to Winter, I love being outdoors: skiing, hiking, snowshoeing, trail-running.

But after spending a few hours in cold conditions, I always have a heck of a time warming up.

Likewise, when I’ve done winter camping, the only time I am truly warm is when I am buried inside my sleeping bag. And, as you know, sleeping bags are great for sleeping in and not much else. You’re essentially a human burrito capable of rolling from side to side without much freedom of movement.

When Selk’Bag reached out for Huck Adventures to review their wearable sleeping bag, I was 100% game.

Selk'Bag Wearable Sleeping Bag
Selk’Bag Wearable Sleeping Bag

The Selk’Bag is a human-shaped sleeping bag. It has openings for arms and legs. You can walk, run, and jump around easily in it, but you can also sit cozily reading a book or stand cooking a meal.

The Selk’Bag has pockets for days, including a kangaroo style pouch in the front that’s perfect for resting your hands or holding essentials like your smartphone. It also has a cargo pocket on the side.

It comes several zippered ventilation openings: on both legs and on the waist so you can access your pant pockets.

There’s an adjustable hood with a built-in balaclava for additional warmth and protection.

Selk'Bag Wearable Sleeping Bag
Selk’Bag Wearable Sleeping Bag

For additional warmth and coziness, the Selk’Bag also has elastic hand covers that slip on and off easily. And it has removable booties—perfect for sleeping in.

The Selk’Bag is filled with synthetic insulation that mimics the properties of down clusters, which kept me extra toasty while wearing it.

Selk'Bag Wearable Sleeping Bag
Selk’Bag Wearable Sleeping Bag

For testing, I wore it after a few high-country trail-runs. Once I got back to my car, I stepped into the Selk’Bag before driving back home. Typically after cold runs like this, I spend a majority of my time shaking, trying to regulate my temperature. But with the Selk’Bag on, within a handful of minutes I was comfy and warm.

With the ventilation openings, I was able to open them easily while I was driving when I got too warm.

I also tested this product at home over several days when I had a breakthrough case of COVID. For 72 hours I was cycling an on and off fever and body aches. When I had chills and couldn’t stay warm, I turned to the Selk’Bag. It was cozy enough that I fell asleep on my couch seated upright, the hood acting as a pillow of sorts.

Selk'Bag Wearable Sleeping Bag
Selk’Bag Wearable Sleeping Bag

One other thing I’ll note is the sizing. I am 5’11” and 185 pounds. According to their sizing chart, a Large fits up to a 5’11” adult, but I found it too tight in the crouch. When I did simple movements like sitting, I felt that I might tear the fabric. So I sized up to an XL that fits up to 6’4″. This size was comfortable and I was able to move freely, but I had to roll the sleeves and legs so that it fit better.

I am looking forward to taking the Selk’Bag with me on my next winter camping excursion. This has become a trusted partner to keep me warm on the coldest of days. It is rated between 44ºF to 35ºF, but I did test it in 20ºF temperatures for two hours and stayed comfortable.

The Selk’Bag model I tested was their Original Recycled. They have several models to choose from, including ones for kids.

The Best Backpacking Food Ideas for Each Meal & Diet

With so many fancy food options out there, finding good, nourishing food that fits your diet can be challenging, even cooking in your kitchen at home! Throwing in a camping stove and a dirt-floor kitchen certainly doesn’t make things any easier. Below, find a collection of backpacking food ideas for your next overnight, three-day or thru-hike!

Recipe Ideas for Vegetarians

Breakfast:

Egg bombs! Beat some eggs, throw in your favorite omelette ingredients and throw it all in the oven in a muffin tin. You also could bake them in a pie crust for a mini-quiche. Eat them cold while on the run or throw them, foil and all, into a fire or over a stove to warm them up and eat from your sleeping bag!

Trusty instant oatmeal. When backpacking, I like to spice mine up with fresh fruit, nut butters, powdered milk (great for longer trips) and instant coffee when I really need some help. I also find the runnier it is, the less I mind the stickiness of instant oats.

backpacking food ideas peak refuel granola

Freeze-dried breakfast. Several days into a trip, another bowl of oatmeal can look like an uphill battle. So, I will occasionally treat myself. Peak Refuel makes a good strawberry granola (it has berries in a bag! Just add cold water), and many other brands make egg-based breakfasts worth trying.

Lunch:

Veggie cheese wraps. They got me through almost the entire Great Divide Mountain Bike Route. 2,700 miles of bell peppers, soft cheese and seasoning salt wrapped in a hearty tortilla. Of course, ingredients are limited by logistics, but we found cucumbers and bell peppers were robust enough for two to three days of wraps. A soft, white cheese is also important, as no one wants to eat a ¼ pound of cheddar for lunch.

Leftovers. On the first day of any backcountry trip, I treat myself by reheating whatever leftovers I had in the fridge that morning. Hearty dinners are a favorite of mine, and the best backpacking food out there, so anything hard to cook on a camp stove can be a treat. Just reheat and eat.

Dinner:

Instant rice, refried beans, cheese and spinach. I try to keep my dinner simple to prepare and simple to cook. Cook the rice, dump everything in and enjoy all the major macronutrients and some fiber to boot. There are a thousand permutations on this one. Starch, protein, fat, green is my formula, and it rarely steers my wrong. I also find myself cracking eggs into just about everything. Just be careful when you pack the eggs! Plastic egg cradles work, but I find myself leaving them in the cardboard and swaddling them with clothes.

Vegan Backpacking Food Ideas

Breakfast:

Sweet porridge. We’ve all eaten enough oatmeal in our lives, so in the backcountry I mix it up. Common favorites are grits, halwa (made with semolina flour), and polenta. Adding additional fat, usually olive oil, and chia seeds keeps everything tasting like the yummy stuff I eat at home without all the heavy ingredients like coconut milk.

Lunch:

Powdered hummus. It sounds like an abomination, but it genuinely is pretty rad. Especially days into an adventure that fresh hummus just isn’t tough enough for, the powdered stuff is worth its weight in gold. When I’m out of backpacking food ideas, I mix it up and eat it on its own or mix it in with other cooked ingredients for a high-protein sauce in other endeavors.

Backpacking Food Ideas for Dinner:

Grain bowls. Especially for longer trips, whole grains are a very important part of my food planning. Dense and shelf-stable, they are a constant in my pack. Beyond the grain, it all comes down to preference. My dinners, diet to diet, vary in substance but not structure. I try to include a starch, fat, protein and green in each dinner. For vegans, that can look like farro, kalamata olives, broccoli, sun-dried tomatoes some fried tofu (if I’ve got any left after nibbling), and a light sauce based on the sun-dried tomato oil. Depending on the trip, I might pre-cook the tofu or broccoli, but if I intend to eat it on the second or third day of a trip, I’ll toss everything into the boiling water sequentially, steaming everything together.

backpacking food ideas hobo dinner

Hobo dinner. If you’re in a place where fires are permitted and convenient, an excellent, low-input option is tossing a potato (sweet is my preference) wrapped in foil into the fire. Once it smells good, pull it out! This works for most vegetables, but if you’re going to throw a container of broccoli in the fire, make sure to oil it a bit first. Once you’ve got the potato cooked, load it up like a baked potato with vegan cheese (if you roll that way), tasty veggies, and maybe some avocado. The meltier the toppings get, the better! And no stove required.

Keto Backpacking Food Ideas

Breakfast:

Eggs bombs! If you can’t tell, I love eggs. Similar to the vegetarian version, throw all the meat, vegetables and cheese you can fit in, then warm them up in foil over a stove. The cheesier they are, often the better they stand up to time in a backpack.

Lunch:

Chicken salad. Especially if it’s avocado-based, it’ll keep well in a backpack longer than cream-based options. Celery is a great add to keep it crunchy on the second or third day.

Bacon Avocado Power Bowl. This is a friend’s invention, mashing crispy bacon, avocado, sauteed greens and sometimes salmon together. The mixture becomes dense, but always tastes so freaking good. Make sure to cook the bacon ahead of time; it gets messy doing it in camp!

Backpacking Food Ideas for Dinner:

backpacking food ideas meat and veggies

Meat and Veggies. If I’m only going out for a day or two or camping somewhere cold, I’ll bring some pre-cooked steak or pork chops. After a long day, it doesn’t matter much if they’re warm or not, but a quick rewarm is easy enough. On longer trips, I’ll bring packet tuna, smash it with avocado and cheese, and toss with some cooked zucchini to keep it from getting too dense. This style of dinner often ends up cold, as the reheating of everything together on a single burner can get complicated.

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